Looking for more articles on transmission? Create your own custom news feed.

Get started
article

EPA and Kickapoo Tribe to prevent ground water pollution

Save It Saved
water-984058_640

DALLAS, TEXAS, OCT 30, 2017 -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently awarded the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma a performance partnership grant of $282,357 for administering a variety of pollution-control programs.

"Environmental protection is a partnership between EPA, states and tribes," said Administrator Scott Pruitt. "This grant will allow the Kickapoo Tribe the ability to apply environmental funds where it is needed the most -- addressing water pollution."

The funds will primarily go toward establishing and maintaining adequate measures for prevention and control of surface and ground water pollution from both point and nonpoint sources. Funds will also assist the tribe in building core environmental protection program capacities such as indoor air, underground storage tanks, solid and hazardous waste management. Typically, this type of grant can apply to different programs and be used to address cross-cutting issues.

 

According to Chairman David Pacheco, Jr., "GAP dollars support all of the environmental work that we do here at the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma. Our partnership with the EPA benefits both the Tribe and non-tribal residents and businesses in central Oklahoma. Our environmental staff and EPA Region 6 staff have created a strong partnership, a partnership we look forward to strengthening under the leadership of Administrator Scott Pruitt. Our environmental staff will continue to work tirelessly to protect natural resources, promote good stewardship, and deliver results despite budget limitations."

Performance partnership grants are important tools for EPA to provide financial assistance to states and tribes. These grants allow recipients to use EPA awards with greater flexibility for priority environmental problems or program needs, streamline paperwork and accounting procedures to reduce administrative costs, and try cross-program initiatives and approaches that were difficult to fund under traditional category grants.

Suggestions For You: